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. this is by the way his first visit to china either as president of the united states or as a private citizen. what the white house said is look if we are going to come to china, of course, we will come to beijing and have high level meetings there but we would also like to do an event in shanghai. it is undoubtedly the most western leaning of the cities in china. a go-go modern city. the commercial center of gravity throughout all of asia and the white house said we want to have something there a little less controlled and has a little less protocol and formality and have an event with some of the students in the overall shanghai region. the white house describes the students as the future leaders of china. the president wants to show them and the larger chinese community is that there can be give and take between the united states and china that is not so controlled. whether it is over human rights, economics, military strategy or a wide range of issues, global climate change would be another and that is one of the underlying motives for the white house in putting together the event, town hall, p
who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states. but we do have one. that's pretty of cour pretty p obvious. we have taken too heightly danger of the propaganda in the united states and the extent to which the mosques in the united states can reinforce these attitudes. so it's something that requires a lot more effort on the part of the bureau. >> paul: what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young muslim american to go over to al-qaeda? i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode, because it seems that some of them were radicalized if that is the right word by the invasion by ethiopia of somalia in 2007 that the united states supported. can it be one event like that? >> yes. there are many factors that come into play and there has been excellent studies looking at islamic militants, particularly those in europe. and you do tend to esee a pattern. first, there tends to be something deeply personal that strikes that believer and it r radicalizes him and makes him believe that the muslim community at large, what is almost a virtual
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
interact with the rest of the taxode heren the united states. anwe don't have a value-added tax. so,gain, i don... again, it's been dcussed in academic circles. i ha not heard serious policy diussion of it en coming from citol hill. so it seems likeore of an academic idea at thi point tn an idea that's directlyn the mix in terms of policy. >> rose: what's going to be the biggest contributoto dicit reduction? >> well, over the long term i thk we need to be ver clear that it is not possible t tax your way out of the fcal trajectory that we're on. and further more,it's not possible to reduce spending outside of health care sufficientlyo addressur.... >> re: that means defse d... >> rht. our longerm fiscal problem is dispportionately influenced by the rate at which heah care costs grow. >> rose: right. >> over th next five or ten years, the sittion is a little bit different and the mixmay vary. buover the next 20, 30, 40, 70 100 years, the key thing is lping to reducehe rate of growth in health ce cts. wiout that, notng elsee do will matr. >> ros and so the bill is that's goi to come out of the
and gentlemen, the president of the united states. >> ladies and gentlemen, please remain standing for the procession of our nation's colors and those of our veterans service organizations and the united states air force concert band plays the -- plays the "national emblem march". ♪ ♪ ♪ [the "national emblem march" playing] ♪ >> please remain standing for the prayer for all veterans delivered by chaplain keith etheridge, director of the department of veterans affairs chaplain service. >> please join me in prayer. eternal god, another year has passed and once again we get there before you in this sacred amphitheater to pray and honor american veterans. as we gather here, we see new faces of family members still grieving the loss of loved ones who have made the ultimate sacrifice for the cause of freedom. we pray for them and for all veterans and their families who gather in ceremonies large and small at this hour to honor the living and the dead who have served in our armed forces. we especially pray for our soldiers set fort hood and for their families -- bless our veterans
the united states and cuba. a key congressional committee is discussing lifting the ban on americans traveling to cuba. could the embargo fall next? we talk to the committee chairman and to a leading human rights advocate with a scathing report on cuba. plus, differing viewpoints from two officials who have just returned from there. >>> but first, cnn's nick robinson reports on the new robotic warfare over afghanistan and pakistan. it's conducted from thousands of miles away in suburban america. >> reporter: look around this room. it's been hit by a missile fired from an unmanned aerial vehicle, a uav, more commonly known as a drone. the family living here say children were killed in this u.s. attack. the children were never the target, but in pakistan's tribal border region, the death spelled trouble for u.s. foreign policy. where many believe that fighting with drones is cowardly. >> last year, one of the most popular songs in pakistani pop culture was a song whose lyrics talked about how america fights without honor. >> reporter: launched from just over the border in afghanistan,
how the united states may change this influence, address this national security deficiencies him and provide global leadership in an era when the american economy may not be the overwhelming source of power it once was. increasingly, national influence will be determined by whether the countries can contribute to solving global problems or at lease whether they are making themselves indispensable to other nations. china and other developing economies are demanding a greater say in the management of the world economy through the g20 and other mechanisms. china's global leverage has increased as it liberally positioned itself as a creditor nation with more than 20% of the world current account balance surplus. we cannot depend invasively on china investing heavily in the united states government that. some thought must be given to how we work with china and other nations to establish a more sensible global balance that depends less on demand by american consumers. the united states in the g20 also must rethink the role of the international financial institutions that provide crisis
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
of the world's challenges cannot be solved unless the united states and china work together rts. >> reporter: but there was another challenge, how to address china's record on human rights. the president broached the topic at a town hall meeting with university students in shanghai earlier in the day. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation. but we also don't believe that the principless that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms of expression and worship, of access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights. they should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> reporter: following past practice for such events chinese authorities detained dozens of human rights activists in advance of the president's visit. mr. obama did not mention the crackdown but he did chide the chinese government for internet censorship. china has 250 million internet users but also employs the world's tightest controls over web access. >> i am a
would be investigated. this is one many flawed parts of the resolution. the united states will remain a true friend to our ally, israel. so let us call for an open and honest debate with the reputable justice goldstone. let us not act in haste to pass a resolution that in no way achieve our ultimate goal of achieving a lasting peace for israelis and palestinians. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. ellison: may i inquire as to the time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has one 3/4 minutes remaining. mr. ellison: i yield one minute to the gentleman from massachusetts. >> i ask permission to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> this resolution should not be coming before us. there is an anti-israel bias in the united nations, but it should be the responsibility of every member of this house to bring it back to the peace talk table. this resolution does not do that. this resolution heightens the rhetoric of division. regardless of what you think of the goldstone report, it makes an
industrial zone between egypt, israel and the united states. it has helped to boost our trade and export to the united states. but in the meantime, we are also working in new channels to support some initiatives between the two countries. and that's what i hope we can conclude in washington on monday. >> and what would you like to hear in order to walk away and feel that that was successful? >> well, we are still waiting to hear from the administration a stronger message about opening up in trade, not just with egypt, also with the rest of the world. i think that is a big question hanging at the moment in terms of the position of the administration, towards liberalization of trade. and i have to admit that this is a worry that we all have in emerging markets at the moment. but i feel confident because of the long history of the relationship between the two countries, that the support for a high level of economic cooperation between egypt and the united states will be materialized during this administration. >> well, it's true, i guess, in the economic slowdown, you know, countries across
to assume and they don't like having all the pressure brought on by the united states to ratchet up the level of chinese obligation. >> rose: also this evening, french chef eric ripert of the famous new york restaurant la bernadine. >> so when i came to new york, we're talking about 20 years ago. i came with a very french way of seeing food with a very strong mediterranean influence and then i discovered japanese cuisine. i discovered chinese cuisine, i went to brooklyn and visit the stores where they have all the spices. i traveled throughout the u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he
and the other is that jesus isn't just for christians in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble bause we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's not because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to
the united states' mission and its allies' mission going forward? >> in the larger sense, of course, the mission really depends on a great deal more than just corruption, although that is certainly a concern here. mcchrystal, i think, is prepared now to accept some redefinition of what the counterinsgency strategy is going to be. that is doing the same with fewer troops or narrowing the mission somewhat. but, again, president karzai, it seems to me, is really of the opinion that the united states is really stuck with them and that his election has given the united states no real alternative. therefore, he has the latitude to really take this as a rate of change that he would like and one that we probably would not like. >> what's the blueprint here? >> the blueprint essentially is to be able to do the basics of what counterinsurgency requires and that is to be able to protect large population centers and to devote most of our energies now into regaining the confidence of the afghan people. unfortunately, karzai's actions in recent times, not just corruption, but failure to deliver b
to be friends. >> the united states does not seek to contain china nor does a deeper relationship of china mean a weakening of bilateral alliances. on the contrary. the rietz of a strong prosperous china can be a source of strength for community of nations. >> as parted of his charm offensive before midnight tonight eastern time about an hour, 45 minutes from now the president is scheduled to participate in a town hall style meeting with an audience of mostly young people in the big chinese city of shanghai with the latest on that from shanghai major garrett who is traveling with the president joins us. hey, major, what's the buzz on this town hall? is it expected to be adoring or confrontational? >>> oo it will probably be something in between. they are dickering or fighting over each other in the contours or consent to the town mall. to circumvent the election to control the events being imposed to president obama the white house invited and collected through the u.s. embassy questions through the web site for the past couple weeks. the president will get those unseen in the course of the tow
in dealing with the united states. prime minist yukio hatoyoma s kept that prise, making i clearhat japan will no lo ar how itself t be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especily on the issuef american milary bases. has gtten wasngton's tention, and itsrespect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming, ce again. in night's "lead focus" the presidensanalysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in tokyo, t first stop on a four-nation tour that include siapore, china, south korea. shortly after hi arrival, esident obama met with e japanese primminister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on thetable, o afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in theiralks obama d the prime minister addressed bigges sore spot in u.s./japan relations the pressness of an air base in okinawa. ny are demanding the base be closed with protests taking place before the presidens arrival. both countriewould meet to address japan's concern about the base. >> our goal remains the same, and that's torovide for the defee of ja. with minimal intsion on the lives the people w share the pa. >
missions to the united states in 1926, he committed an act of violence, and attempted murder in los angeles and was incarcerated in san quentin prison. this becomes a very crucial question as to the veracity of his famous book, "our of the night," in 1941, when eventually appears. immediately it had the following effect on him: krebbs became one of the editors and contributors to the san quentin prisoners magazine. he took lots of extension courses in writing from the university of california and at that point he determined to become a writer. he got all of san quentin in 1929, was deported, went back to europe and got caught up again and communist activities. according to him, he was thrown into jail by the nazis from which he escaped by the following routt: he converted to nazism, the nazis let him out so he could go out and be as it were a double agent for his former communist allies. they, however, didn't think there was anything phony about his -- about his conversion. and under these circumstances, he said he chased by the secret police, both of russia and of germany. he took off wi
that was licensed in the united states. we have done those things. we have shifted all the vaccine manufacturing to the extent we can to multi those virus first because there faster to fill, with leaving the rest of leftover for the single dose syringes. we have worked with them to shift everything they can do to get the vaccine out as fast as they possibly can. then we are tracking through the process step by step. to the degree that when a lot is ready to be released at a manufacturer, we have a truck waiting. it pulls up at the loading dock ready to accept that vaccine and bring it to the distribution sites. if we have been working through this every step of the process to get any delays out. that is what a sight visits have largely been about. >> a question about the contracts. [unintelligible] to produce this reject all under 51 million doses, kabbalah contracted the manufacturers to fill 117 million doses. why aren't they able to undo the full amount of doses -- able to do the full amount of doses? >> we need to make sure we have enough vaccine derived the time people want it and being ca
the last eight years united states has become cuba's principal food supply year and fifth largest trading partner, but americans cannot walk our streets or shop with our people. only recently we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. it should be recalled that the iron curtain started to open up by millions of westerners visiting the country's. we are grateful to the politicians who carried out the policy that helped create the conditions for this peaceful outcome. americans played a significant role. today you have a similar opportunity regarding cuba. we are aware of the concern of many distinguished congress women and men of the financial the impact of american tourism on the cuban economy, fearing that the civility of giving birth to the totalitarian regime we believe that many thousands of americans visiting cuba would benefit our society and enhance our people. firstly through the free flow of ideas and further asking the government to open up and provide goods and services such as renting rooms because the capacities in the hotels would be surpassed. it wou
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
telling the president of the united states no, i don't even want olympia snowe, i'd want one republican supporting health care bill? >> the truth is -- i'm going to disagree right now. free enterprise does not work particularly well in health care and i will tell you why. the administration rate -- >> we don't have insurance companies competing across state lines 3 >> that's the worst thing you could do. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. i will explain why this is. in my state, everybody under 18 has health care. you cannot be refused by any insurance company, no matter what the reason is. everybody gets charged the same. you cannot charge a sick patient who is older more than 20% more than you can charge a young, healthy patient. that has been going on for 15 years. if you could let people buy insurance across state lines, you are making the texas health commissioner be my health commissioner. do you know what the insurance rate is in in texas? 25%. 22% of children have no health insurance in texas. i do not want health commissioner in texas to have anything to do with my health insurance
, it was six world powers that made a move today. delegates from the united states, britain, france, germany, russia and china met in brussels, belgium, and turned up the heat on iran. they didn't discuss the sanctions, not yet anyway, but that possibility served as a backdrop for today's meetings. the issue is iran's nuclear ambitions. tehran says its uranium enrichment program is for peaceful purposes only, but other countries worry it gives iran the capability of making an atomic bomb. despite some optimism in recent weeks, iran now seems to be rejecting a plan to have its uranium enriched outside the country. the delegates in brussels urged iran to reconsider, and hence the talk by president obama and others this week about the possibility of new sanctions. what kind of measures and when, that is our "lead focus" tonight. weeks after iran disclosed the existence of this once-secret nuclear facility near the holy city of qom, in brussels today representatives of the world's major powers pressed iran to accept a plan to curb its nuclear ambitions. the six countries released this statement
, including ethnic and regious minorities whether they e in the united states, cha or any nation. >> reporte following past actice for such event chinese ahorities detained dozens of human rits activists in vance of the presint's visit. mr. obama did not menti the crackdown but did chide the chine government for internet nsorship. china has 250 milon intert users but also employs the wod's tightest controls over web accs. >> i am a g believer in technoloy. and i'm a big liever in openns when it comes to the flow of informatn. i think that the morereely inrmation flows, the stronger the socie becom. because then citizens of countries arounthe world can hold their own governments accountable. ey can begin to think for themselves. that generates new ids. it encouages creativit >>orter: the president suggesteds communist rulers shou have nothing to fear fr more openness. heited criticism he faces at home. >> the truth is that becau in the united states information is free d i have a lot of itics in the uted states who can say all kinds of things out me, i actually think th that makes o democrac
it from europe, you see it from the united states and you see it from asia. tell me what you see. >> well, i see a very different situation. in europe there is no recovery and i think 2010's going to be a mediocre year in europe. same thing in japan. we don't see any recovery. we see resistance to the decline but no recovery. in the united states, things look more promising for the short term. you know, after a very large chop in the economy and particularly in the automobile industry. >> rose: but generally those impressions you just said are about the economy overall. >> yeah, but the economy overall we see slight growth in 2010. but a situation very different from one country to the other. >> rose: at what point in an economic recovery do consumers think about automobiles? >> well, you know, it depends where the consumer is. if he's in china or in brazil or india, he's thinking all the time about automobiles. what's the best opportunity? what's the best deal? and we're seeing these sales booming all the time. you know, no matter what. now, in that time, you have an increase of 5% or 10
that we have had the highest deficit in the history of the united states, $1. trillion, -- the $1.4 trillion, the pelosi plan comes in weighing at $1 trillion. when we just got unemployment figures back, think about this, the president with an 8.5% unemployment rate pushes upon the congress a $787 billion stimulus bill and now unemployment has gone from 8.5% to 10.2% and in so many other pockets of america it's 14%, 15% and 16%. where are the jobs? why have we taken the focus off the main thing, the economy? why are we going down the track of government takeover of health care? and massive mandates on individuals, doctors and small businesses? just like china. mr. speaker, 1,900 pages, it's ridiculous. the republican alternative, which is not even half, not even 25%, but i'd say maybe 15% in size, weighing in at say maybe a mere $1 -- 150 pages, bring more competition for individuals, association health care plan to let small businesses pool together, expansion of health savings accounts, medical malpractice reform to reduce frivolous lawsuits. this is the republican alternative a
will also talk about the growth of islamic radicalism within the united states. all those topics and your calls, starting tomorrow at 7:00. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . >> here is what is ahead. next, a look at the history of the atomic bomb. then a panel discussion on global security after the fall of the berlin wall. later, a review of the 2008 elections. saturday, a look back at the cuban missile crisis with former kennedy advisers ted sorensen and karaoke secret have war threats been over hyped in the post cold-war world? a university of virginia panel on how the political process has been affected by the internet. and facebook founder chris hughes on how social networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> on this vote, the yeahs are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed to. >> with that vote, the senate moves the health care bill to the floor. starting monday and through december, follow the entire debate, and how the bill would affect access to medical care,
is mmitted tohe effort in ahanistan. they're waiting, like the rest of the world i, the united states andhrough president obama to announc our ientions and our way forward. but they have a deep unrstanding of why this is portant for nato, why this important for the larger international communit ani think that given the right meures of accounbility that we need to be seeking from presidenkarzai and his government, we're goingto see a commitment n just from germany but fromany ofur nato allies. >> rose: mightthey makeup whever the gap is between what general mcchrystals seeking and what the united stes is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, ihink we have to wa for th president's announcement. buwe will be, as we have been, consulting very deeplyur ales and talng about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civian strategy. cause, remember it's not ju out troops on theground, it's about making sur that the people of afghastan see the results ofhis efft. that they ha more faithin their own governments of... as an enty thatan deliverfor em.
but there is no question that commercial property in the united states is in bad shape it is going down. and there is a lot of genuine worries about that. dubai as a symbol might focus more attention next week but i think dubai is postly about emerging markets. our home problems are very much about the united states and they are very big and they are much bigger, actually, than the problems in dubai. >> warner: so the u.s. problems you think are a lot bigger. >> the total losses from the crisis so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talking about credit losses in dubai of perhaps $20 billion. so that an order of magnitude, two orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have seen in the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200, 300 billion but they are coming on top of all these existing problems. they are coming into a banking system that is weak already in the united states. >> warner: so briefly do we have reason to be nervous by what happened today in dubai. >> yes, it should make us nervous. came at an ago waurd
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
together this time with the united states and with binding obligations in some form on china and other large emerging economies and it's significant because the scientific community globally has ratcheted up their sense of alarm and you are general they we really don't have too many years to begin are reducing the global warming pollution that is driving the earth's ecological system toward catastrophe. >> rose: stay with that. they say ten years. the window they say is ten years essentially? >> yeah, and they said that three years ago. >> rose: and cat trophy means what? >> there's certain elements in the earth's ecological system that could be pushed beyond a kind of tipping point the phrase is controversial. but if the greenland ice pack, for example, was induced to melt so rapidly that it could not be stopped that would lead to catastrophic sea level rise, similarly in west antarctica. either would produce a six to seven meter increase. the size of the continental united states, it's been there for three million years, a key element in the earth's ability to cool itself, if it disa
. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this week hearings and investigations began into the massacre of 13 soldiers at ft. hood, texas. the number one question, why didn't anyone in charge see it coming? i spoke about that with congressman pete hoekstra, he's the ranking member of the house intelligence committee. congressman, thanks very much for coming in. i know you're getting ready to catch a flight. are you satisfied with the answers you're getting so far from the executive branch of the u.s. government whether the pentagon or the administration, the army, as far as this investigation is concerned? >> no, wolf, i'm really not. and i think i probably share some of the same frustrations that senator lieberman has. i applaud the senate for holding public hearings. i hold them -- i applaud them for doing the hearings. there's no indication at all that that's going to take place on the house side. and i think they really do have to take place. you know, we had a briefing today, but way too o
is the optimal solution to provide necessary medical treatment to everyone and the united states in a way that controls health care costs. pnhp doesn't, however, take a position on how congress members should vote on the legislation that is currently proceeding for congress. we do provide information to members about whether the legislation is likely to be ctive, and how icompes to a national single payer health care system. we joined the many health care reform advocates across the nation who are disappointed by the health insurance reform legislation that is passing through congress. we, like you, are seriously concerned by the health care environment in the united states. we are saddened by the number of people, our patience, family and friends who are donner and because they cannot receive or for access to health care. we are saddened by the number of people facing bankruptcy or foreclosure of their homes and those who are suffering needlessly because they cannot afford or have access to medical treatment. the anticipated a health care debate this year that would focus on the trees st
that there are 200 million jews and the world and israel is half the size of europe. it is not. the united states and canada are roughly 400 times each the size of israel. the arab world is 500 times the size of israel. egypt alone is roughly the 40 times the size of israel. and even a small country like jordan, our neighbor to the east, is almost four times as big. israel is bigger than rhode island. [laughter] that is about it. [laughter] now, mind you, small countries are not necessarily insecure. belgium and luxembourg are small, but today they are not insecure. if their neighbors included radical regimes bent on their conquest, bent on their destruction, it they fell the -- if they feel that terror proxy's that fire thousands of missiles on their population, believe me, they too would feel insecure. anybody would. because of our small size and the radical and violent neighborhood in which we live, israel faces security threats like that of no other nation. here are two facts from recent days alone that will drive this point home. a few days ago, the israeli navy it predicted that the ship ca
of the united states, peace can become a reality. [applause] we can surprise a skeptical world. achieving peace is a great challenge facing israel. at the un in september, i spoke of another great challenge. preventing iran from developing a nuclear weapons capability. the iranian regime tyrannizes its people, sponsors and supplies terrorists and openly pledges to wipe israel off the map. just imagine how much more dangerous this regime would be it had atomic bombs. the responsible members of the international community must unite to prevent this grave threat to the pace of the entire world. i support president obama's continued efforts towards these ends. i appreciate the firm position taken by the leading european governments. we must not succumb to the iranian regime's cutting into its to see. we must stand together to stop tehran from realizing its nuclear ambitions. in addition to achieving peace, and to preventing a nuclear iran, there is a third momentous challenge before us. reducing the world's dependence on oil. this would help cleanse our world after more than a century of industrial
into office on a promise of change. including asserting greater independence in dealing with the united states. prime minister yukio hatoyoma has kept that promise, making it clear that japan will no longer allow itself to be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especially on the issue of american military bases. he has gotten washington's attention, and its respect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming once again. in tonight's "lead focus" the president's analysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in japan friday afternoon, tokyo time, the first stop on a four-nation tour that will include singapore, china and south korea. shortly after his arrival, president obama met with the japanese prime minister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on the table, afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in their talks, obama and the prime minister addressed biggest sore spot in u.s./japan relations -- the presence of an air base on okinawa. many japanese are demanding that the base be closed, with protests takin place prior to obama's visit. after today's talks the two lea
, opening up new opportunities for u.s. workers here in the united states of america which is exactly what is being said to president obama as he meets in korea at this moment with their leadership. with president lee and others. so i think that we need to have our attention in this congress focused on the priorities -- the priorities the american people have. fire fighting is very, very important. but again this measure will pass if not unanimously narrowly unanimously and it will do so and i hope get the resources to ensure that we never have the loss of life like those of captain hall and others. but i know from having spoken to their families, mr. speaker, that they believe that the absolutely essential for us to encourage private sector job creation and economic growth and that's why i'm talking about this priority that needs to be addressed here. now, mr. speaker, i'm going to urge my colleagues to defeat the previous question as we move ahead. why? because the issue of reading legislation is another very, very important one that is before us. there is a bipartisan proposal launched
the train is leaving the station. tomorrow night the united states senate. votes on whether to let debate on the health care reform bill begin. the republicans are all voting nay. if the democrats can't get 60 votes, that's it. it's over. it looks like they can do it. health care leaves the senate station. the top of the show tonight. >>> plus president obama has his chin out on just about every hot issue out. there health care, terror trials, job losses, even the breast cancer report. he is exposed and vulnerable. his poll number are dropping. is he just too darned intellectual? too much the egg head? why did he bow to that japanese emperor? why did he pick tim geithner to be his economic front man? why thought dithering over afghanistan and who thought it was a wonderful idea to write the killers of 9/11 to new york city? the media capital of the world so they could tell their story? is obama channeling adlai stevenson? >>> and sunday is the anniversary of the jfk. what really happened in the frantic hours after the shooting. especially about lbj. the author of a new book on the kennedy
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